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Our hashtag for the RHS Chatsworth Flower Show 2017 #QuarryGarden

Comprised of around 6,000 members in some 50 countries of the world, the Institute of Quarrying (IQ) is the international professional body for quarrying, construction materials and the related extractive and processing industries. Membership is open to individuals sharing our commitment to improving standards and lifelong learning. The long-term objective of the Institute is to promote progressive improvements in all aspects of operational performance

through the medium of education and training.

 

The Institute of Quarrying originated in Caernarvon in 1917. IQ’s purpose is to advance the science and practice of quarrying internationally in the interests of the public at large. Today it has approximately 5,200 members working around the world. To support these members the Institute has a network of affiliate offices in Australia, Hong Kong, Malaysia, New Zealand and South Africa.

 

For people working in quarries, the Institute of Quarrying is the professional body to support career development within the mineral extractives industry.

 

Being a member of the Institute of Quarrying means that your skills and training are recognised and promoted as being professional. Only the Institute of Quarrying has the history, knowledge and international experience of quarrying operations to be able to advise and shape the skills and training required by individuals and operators to build successful careers and businesses.

 

IQ exists to support people working in the mineral extractives industry. This industry is a key supplier to other industries that create the buildings and environment we all live in as well as the manufacturers of numerous everyday products that many of us take for granted.

 

People working in the mineral extractives industry deliver the high safety and operational standards required for mineral extractives companies to be successful. By promoting their professionalism and need for ongoing development, the industry can continue to deliver improved performance and

profitability. This benefits the communities in which the sites operate, their employees and the customers they serve.

 

The high standards required of the industry are actively debated and shared amongst our members. This willingness to support each other in order to deliver a highly performing industry helps to raise the profile of the sector as a whole. We want the mineral extractives industry to be valued by all as a positive one to work in and vital for the growth of the wider economy.

 

The spirit of collaboration extends beyond the mineral extractives operators to include manufacturers and suppliers of products and services that support the extractives industry. By working with these partners we help to facilitate discussions involving the whole industry, which in turn brings greater

benefit and value to our members.

 

In undertaking such a wide remit we will never lose sight of our role and responsibilities to the industry. We understand that to achieve greater benefit for the industry we must always act ethically and with respect. Our dealings with all parties will be transparent and based on trust.

 

  • Creating habitats big and small by Nature After Minerals

    Creating habitats big and small by Nature After Minerals

    Nature After Minerals (NAM) – an RSPB-led partnership programme with support form Natural England, the Mineral Products Association and the British Aggregates Association – just digs quarries!  The programme does all it can to highlight the great potential quarries represent not only in helping supply our everyday products and major infrastructure but in helping to provide a vital home for nature and refuge for people, once extraction work is completed.

     

    Dotted across our national landscape, these sites are unique in their potential to deliver for nature after commercial operations, by providing stepping stone refuges for some of our most endangered...

     

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  • Age of Grit and Lime – the Bedrock of Derbyshire by Clive Mitchell, British Geological Survey

    Age of Grit and Lime – the Bedrock of Derbyshire by Clive Mitchell, British Geological Survey

    My thoughts of Derbyshire are usually full of the walking routes I’ve followed across the Peak District. As a geologist, the contrast evident in the geology of the White and Dark Peaks is stark. The seemingly peaceful, verdant green pastures, drystone walled farmland of the limestone dales surrounded by the brooding heathland moors and the dramatic sheer-sided edges of the gritstone uplands.

     

    For the keen observer, the evidence of past industry and human ingenuity is all around, often overgrown and gently merging back into the landscape. My walks often take me along canal tow paths and mineral railway lines, through rocky cuttings, dripping tunnels and steep inclines...

     

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  • Quarry Garden: The Final Countdown

    Planting the seeds for the Quarry Garden by Connie Cliff, NTU Horticulture student

    With less than a month to go, the final countdown is on to the debut of our Quarry Garden at the first ever RHS Chatsworth Flower Show. The build is underway and we’re getting final preparations ready for what will be a spectacular event celebrating our centenary year.

     

     

    Why a quarry garden? It was suggested by IQ member Glyn Barnes at a centenary discussion way back in 2015. “My love of gardening and the wildlife it encourages were a big inspiration behind the idea to have a Quarry Garden. A garden that will showcase what the quarrying industry contributes to...

     

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  • Using stone from the UK’s oldest slate quarry to build the #QuarryGarden monoliths

    Broadening Horizons with the Quarry Garden by Will Scholey, NTU Horticulture student

    The Quarry Garden is a celebration of the contribution the mineral extractives industry makes to our environment. It aims to show how crucial the industry has - and always will be - to our world. It is therefore rather fitting that one of the garden’s main features will be made using slate from Delabole quarry, the oldest of its kind in the UK (and probably the world).

     

     

    Delabole Slate quarry, based in Cornwall, has a rich history of mining that spans hundreds of years. Its slate has been used as a building material for around 800 years, and it has been quarried...

     

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  • Promoting environmental diversity in quarrying by Dr Rob Donnelly, Programme Leader of Mineral Extractive Technologies, University of Derby

    Planting the seeds for the Quarry Garden by Connie Cliff, NTU Horticulture student

    As I regularly ‘preach’ to students during lectures on environmental issues associated with the working and subsequent restoration of mineral extractive sites, what a fantastic palette we have to work with. What opportunities we have to make a substantial difference to our environment, quite possibly more so than any other industry. Our activities create fantastic biodiversity and geodiversity, almost by default…but with a knowing, caring and helping hand along the way, what a difference we can make.

     

    The IQ centenary garden that is to be built at Chatsworth this summer represents and superbly illustrates in microcosm just what we as an industry can do.

     

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  • Broadening horizons with the Quarry Garden by Will Scholey, NTU Horticulture student

    Broadening Horizons with the Quarry Garden by Will Scholey, NTU Horticulture student

    Following our visit to Deepdale Trees where we were given a tour of all the fantastic plants that will be used in the Quarry Garden, we went along to a Bradstone site a couple of weeks ago to take a look at how some of the garden’s stone features will be manufactured.

     

    The tour took us round Bradstone’s Hulland Ward site in Derbyshire. It was really interesting to see how all the different types of stone are produced. The most unexpected thing for me was the sheer scale of the whole operation - huge mechanical robots are working away across the site, producing hundreds of stone slabs a day.

     

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  • Laying the foundations to the IQ #QuarryGarden by Gareth Wilson

    Laying the foundations to the IQ #QuarryGarden

    For G. K. Wilson Garden Services (UK) Ltd, 2017 will represent the seventh year we have been building show gardens for Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) flower shows across the country. In fact, we will enjoy (or endure) a hat-trick challenge this year in creating gardens at RHS Chatsworth Flower Show, RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show and RHS Flower Show Tatton Park.

     

    The first, and most demanding, of these projects is RHS Chatsworth Flower Show 2017 (open 7-11 June). Here we will be building no less than the second biggest show garden in the history of RHS shows.

     

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  • Quarry garden - from concept to Chatsworth

    Planting the seeds for the Quarry Garden by Connie Cliff, NTU Horticulture student

    Turn the clock back to 2015. The team at the Institute of Quarrying was well aware that just over the horizon was the opportunity to celebrate a real milestone in our history - our centenary. How do you mark such an achievement and make it memorable, as well as providing a legacy for future members?

     

    What started as a throwaway comment about a flower show quickly crystallised with all involved and the idea of the ‘Quarry Garden’ was born. The timing was perfect too. We’d just heard of the Royal Horticultural Society’s plans to host their first ever show at Chatsworth. Being based in Nottingham, it felt like the stars were aligning for our 100th anniversary.

     

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  • Planting the seeds for the Quarry Garden by Connie Cliff, NTU Horticulture student

    Planting the seeds for the Quarry Garden by Connie Cliff, NTU Horticulture student

    As a Horticulture student, the opportunity to be involved in this project with the Institute of Quarrying and Paul Hervey-Brookes on the design of an RHS show garden is absolutely incredible. From the initial design stages to watching the project take shape, it’s amazing to be experiencing a first-hand look at how these projects evolve into the magnificent displays that inspired me to choose horticulture as a career path.

     

    Last week, I took a trip with IQ and Paul Hervey-Brookes to Deepdale Trees in Bedfordshire for a tour of the plants that will be used in the Quarry Garden.

     

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  • Creating a Quarry Garden by Paul Hervey-Brookes

    Creating a Quarry Garden by Paul Hervey-Brookes

    Creating a garden for an RHS Show is always such a privilege and also a huge challenge. The garden for the Institute of Quarrying is the second largest garden I have made to date. To give a size comparison, it is roughly the size of one and a half Chelsea Main Avenue show gardens.

     

    The garden has a number of complex elements and ideas. It is, of course, inspired by the beauty of the quarrying landscape. The savage and the exquisite sitting side by side in harmony and to be enjoyed. The garden is made to compliment a home of a young couple who have built a house and want to create a garden.

     

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  • 'Passing Light' sculpture by Ann-Margreth Bohl

    'Passing Light' sculpture by Ann-Margreth Bohl

    Long before humans appeared on the earth, stones shaped the landscape in which we now live.

     

    Stone has been quarried for thousands of years. The worlds first stone structures are found in Malta, the prehistoric temples of Ggantija dedicated to the Great Earth Mother 3600-3000 BC pre-dating Stonehenge and the great pyramids.

     

    The cultivation of food started in prehistoric times, whilst the first evidence of gardens dates back to Mesopotamia 3000 BC.

     

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  • Welcome to the #QuarryGarden

    The IQ blog, all things #QuarryGarden

    2017 is an exciting year for the Institute of Quarrying as we celebrate our centenary. Given the momentous occasion we have planned an exciting calendar of events to take us throughout the year to give it the recognition it deserves.

     

    It’s amazing how 100 years ago the vision of four quarry workers in Wales laid the foundations for a professional body to represent and support individuals working in the mineral extractives sector. Today IQ has grown into a global network with more than 5,000 members across 13 UK branches and international offices in Australia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Hong Kong and South Africa.

     

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Logo for Institute of Quarrying
Link to ShopatIQ.org Link up with us on our Facebook page to stay find out about our latest news. Link up with us on our Twitter page to stay find out about our latest news.
 
  • Laying the foundations to the IQ #QuarryGarden
  • Planting the seeds for the Quarry Garden by Connie Cliff, NTU Horticulture student
  • Planting the seeds for the Quarry Garden by Connie Cliff, NTU Horticulture student
  • Creating a Quarry Garden by Paul Hervey-Brookes
  • 'Passing Light' sculpture by Ann-Margreth Bohl
  • The IQ blog, all things #QuarryGarden